Public Affairs Reputation Management: Benchmarking Report

The Conference Board of Canada, 64 pages, September 8, 2015
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This report provides an overview of the reputation management activities of Canadian firms, including trends and best practices, based on the 2014 Canadian Public Affairs Reputation Management Survey results.

Document Highlights

Companies with strong reputations may see higher market value, stronger sales and customer loyalty, and an improved ability to attract high-quality employees. Increasing interest in reputation management has been driven by a number of long-term trends in business, including the importance of intangible assets, the growing complexity of supply chains, the rise of social media and a faster news cycle, and changing stakeholder expectations regarding a company’s social and environmental impacts. This report provides an overview of the reputation management activities of Canadian firms, including trends and best practices, based on the 2014 Canadian Public Affairs Reputation Management Survey results.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Chapter 1—Introduction

  • Purpose of the Report
  • Understanding Reputation Management
  • Trends Driving Reputational Concerns
  • Proactive Versus Reactive Reputation Management
  • Survey Methodology
  • Profile of Survey Respondents

Chapter 2—Reputational Risks and Motivators

  • Defining Reputation Management
  • Perceptions of Corporate Reputation
  • Top Reputational Risks
  • Reputation Management Motivators
  • Conclusion

Chapter 3—The Structure of Reputation Management Programs

  • The Structure and Management of Reputation Management Programs
  • The Role of Employees in Reputation Management
  • Resources Devoted to Reputation Management
  • Use of External Resources to Manage Reputation
  • Documentation of Reputation Management Plans
  • Conclusion

Chapter 4—Reputation Management Activities

  • Audiences for Reputation Management Activities
  • Reputation Management Activities
  • Suppliers and Contractors and Reputational Risk
  • Industry Association Involvement in Reputation Management
  • The Evolution of Reputation Management Activities
  • Conclusion

Chapter 5—Measuring the Impact

  • The Effectiveness of Reputation Management Activities
  • Reputation Management Metrics and Measurement
  • Conclusion

Chapter 6—Implications for the Future

  • Effective Reputation Management Starts at the Top
  • Employees at the Front Lines of Reputation Management
  • The Reputation of Suppliers and Contractors Matters
  • Industry and Competitor Reputations Matter
  • Measuring the Impact of Reputation Management Programs
  • Conclusion

Appendix A—Note on Methodology

Appendix B—Respondents

Appendix C—Bibliography

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