Podcast

Explore some of the most crucial emerging challenges to the future of work.

Canada is facing wide-reaching demographic and technological changes that pose increasingly significant challenges to the world of work.

The Future Skills Centre Podcast, presented by The Conference Board of Canada, will explore these crucial emerging challenges to the future of work. In each episode, we will unpack a unique issue facing Canadians and hear from varying perspectives—such as community members, decision-makers, and thought leaders—to discuss solutions and paths forward.

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2

Seasons

12

Episodes

8,790

Downloads
(as of September 28, 2022)

All episodes

Episode 6

(28:53 min)

Technological change is affecting every sector, and these changes shift the roles and the skills in demand. Our guests share their perspectives on what needs to happen to ensure Canada has the skilled talent it needs to take full advantage of the growing digital economy. We hear about two rapid training initiatives that seek to help their learners transition mid-career to jobs in the digital economy.

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Host

Linda Nazareth

Linda Nazareth

Economist and Author, Work Is Not a Place: Our Lives and Our Organizations in the Post-Jobs Economy

Guests

Namir Anani

Namir Anani

President & CEO, Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC)

Rushmi Hasham

Rushmi Hasham

Director, Development and Accelerated Cybersecurity Training Programs, Rogers Cybersecure Catalyst

Nathalie Sanon

Nathalie Sanon

Head, Training Program, IVADO

Episode 5

(26:07 min)

In the face of the climate crisis, shifting to more carbon-neutral economic activities is a necessity. The growth of this clean economy can also be an opportunity – for individuals to have in-demand and meaningful careers, and for Canada to become a global leader in this area. In this episode, we hear from three Canadian organizations. Our guests tell us about the growing clean technology and blue economy sectors, and about the skills needed in these sectors, and share their insights on what needs to happen to support the development of a strong workforce in the clean economy.

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Host

Linda Nazareth

Linda Nazareth

Economist and Author, Work Is Not a Place: Our Lives and Our Organizations in the Post-Jobs Economy

Guests

Darren Gresch

Darren Gresch

Senior Research Associate, Innovation and Technology, The Conference Board of Canada

Jeanette Jackson

Jeanette Jackson

CEO, Foresight Canada

Yogendra Chaudhry

Yogendra Chaudhry

Vice-President of Professional Services, ECO Canada

Episode 4

(25:27 min)

Microcredentials are a recognition of learning, assessing specific competencies and addressing employer needs. In this episode, we discuss the rise of microcredentials, their potential, and ongoing challenges such as coordination across Canada and assessment quality. Our guests provide perspectives from industry and from post-secondary education and include Emma Gooch from eCampusOntario, Kerri Korabelnikov from Red River College Polytechnic, and Theresa Davis-Woodhouse from the Canadian Council for Aviation and Aerospace.

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Host

Linda Nazareth

Linda Nazareth

Economist and Author, Work Is Not a Place: Our Lives and Our Organizations in the Post-Jobs Economy

Guests

Emma Gooch

Emma Gooch

Program Manager, Microcredentials, eCampusOntario

Kerri Korabelnikov

Kerri Korabelnikov

Dean, School of Education, Arts and Sciences, Red River College Polytechnic

Theresa Davis-Woodhouse

Theresa Davis-Woodhouse

Director of Project Management, Canadian Council for Aviation & Aerospace

Episode 3

(29:55 min)

Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are an important part of the Canadian economy and the workplace of many Canadians. But these businesses face steep difficulties in the coming years as COVID-19 government supports end. How can SMEs tackle challenges, such as skill and labour shortages, to flourish as businesses and employers?

In this episode we speak to three guests about the economic trends and opportunities facing SMEs in their region, from remote-first small businesses to new jobs in the green economy. They discuss the skills, roles, and supports needed to take advantage of these opportunities.

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Host

Linda Nazareth

Linda Nazareth

Economist and Author, Work Is Not a Place: Our Lives and Our Organizations in the Post-Jobs Economy

Guests

Jason Rasevych

Jason Rasevych

Partner, National Indigenous Client Services Lead, Deloitte Canada; and President, Anishnawbe Business Professional Association

Dorinda So

Dorinda So

Executive Director, pointA

Patrick Sullivan

Patrick Sullivan

President and CEO, Halifax Chamber of Commerce

Episode 2

(19:51 min)

Restaurants, hotels, and attractions across Canada are an important place of work, particularly for youth, students, and newcomers to Canada. But with cycles of closures and layoffs, health and safety concerns, and new enforcement requirements due to COVID-19, there has been an exodus of workers from the hospitality and tourism industry. How are businesses rethinking their hiring, training, and compensation practices to adapt and recover?

This episode explores issues of workforce development and business strategy in the hospitality and tourism industry, in conversation with Matt Pearson from Living Waters Resorts, Krista Bax from go2HR, and Adam Morrison from OTEC. We also hear firsthand from a business about their experiences.

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Host

Linda Nazareth

Linda Nazareth

Economist and Author, Work Is Not a Place: Our Lives and Our Organizations in the Post-Jobs Economy

Guests

Matt Pearson

Matt Pearson

Director, Human Resources, Living Waters Resorts

Adam Morrison

Adam Morrison

President and CEO, Ontario Tourism & Education Council (OTEC)

Krista Bax

Krista Bax

CEO, go2HR

Episode 1

(21:41 min)

We are in the same storm, but not in the same boat.

We know that COVID-19 has had disproportionate economic impacts on certain groups, including women, youth, Indigenous peoples, and newcomers to Canada. We are experiencing an undesirable “K-shaped recovery” where certain individuals and sectors recover more quickly than others.

This episode highlights key challenges facing certain groups—such as Indigenous students and youth more broadly—when it comes to education and employment during the pandemic. We make the case for a more inclusive skills training strategy, that give all workers the skills to navigate a changing economy (and provides businesses the workers with the skills to help them adapt to future technological changes and economic shocks).

Kory Wilson from BCIT, and Chris Duff and Erick Pelayo Aubert from the Canadian Council for Youth Prosperity (CCYP) join us to share their perspectives.

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Host

Linda Nazareth

Linda Nazareth

Economist and Author, Work Is Not a Place: Our Lives and Our Organizations in the Post-Jobs Economy

Guests

Kory Wilson

Kory Wilson

Executive Director, Indigenous Initiatives and Partnerships, BCIT

Chris Duff

Chris Duff

Executive Lead, CCYP

Erick Pelayo Aubert

Erick Pelayo Aubert

Undergraduate student and Coordinator, CCYP

Episode 6

(38:52 min)

The nature of jobs is changing, with the growth of the gig economy and more work in all fields being tasked to contract workers, freelancers, and the self-employed. These independent workers lack the social support net that full-time employees benefit from. What are some ways to bridge the “support gap” and ensure that people don’t fall between the cracks in these precarious job markets?

In our final episode of Season 1 of the Future Skills Centre podcast, we discuss this question and more with Armine Yalnizyan (Atkinson Fellow).

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Armine Yalnizyan

Armine Yalnizyan

Fellow on the Future of Workers, Atkinson Foundation

Episode 5

(32:06 min)

Canada ranks among the top countries in the world in terms of its rates of postsecondary education attainment as well as annual spending per postsecondary student. While a majority of education providers believe that our graduates are well-equipped for the workforce, a much lower proportion of students and employers share that belief.

This points to a disconnect between the education and work worlds, one that could be bridged by incorporating real-world or experiential work into students’ education. The Business + Higher Education Roundtable aims to do just that, by ensuring that 100% of Canadian postsecondary students participate in a form of work-integrated learning before graduation. In our fifth episode of Season 1 of the Future Skills Centre podcast, we speak to Valerie Walker (Business Higher + Education Roundtable) to address some of these issues.

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Valerie Walker

Valerie Walker

CEO, Business + Higher Education Roundtable

Episode 4

(34:02 min)

Reskilling and upskilling are now imperative for both employees and organizations to keep pace with the digital and technological innovations that are changing the way we work. This is creating a new echelon of positions—those that require brand new skills and those that require an enhanced skillset.

Investing in reskilling and upskilling is critical at the organizational and individual level to ensure mutual preparedness and success in the new technology-driven world. But how can governments, organizations, and workers work together to ensure the right supports are being provided to those who need them most? In our fourth episode of Season 1 of the Future Skills Centre podcast, we speak to Glenda Quintini (OECD), Sashya D’Souza (Toronto Finance International), and Karn Singh (Cognizant) to answer some of these questions.

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Glenda Quintini

Glenda Quintini

Senior Economist, Skills and Employability Division, OECD

Sashya D’Souza

Sashya D’Souza

Senior Vice President, Talent Initiatives, Toronto Finance International

Karn Singh

Karn Singh

Director, Workforce Development, Cognizant

Episode 3

(34:52 min)

Apprenticeships get a bad rap. All too often, we perpetuate negative images of the trades: dirty, low pay, and boring. These stereotypes couldn’t be further from the reality of work—young people who pursue an apprentice-able trade should expect intellectually stimulating work, increasingly diverse workplaces, and significant opportunity for financial reward.

The knowledge and skills of our construction, manufacturing, automotive, and food service tradespeople can help support Canada’s transition to a more prosperous and sustainable future, but they will need resilience and teamwork to adapt to workplaces that are more efficient, automated, and digitally connected.

What emerging skills will tradespeople require to adapt to future work trends? How are emerging technologies changing what and how apprentices learn? Will traditional physical labour become a thing of the past, replaced by a need for digital, green, and social and emotional skills? In our third episode of Season 1 of the Future Skills Centre podcast, we discuss these questions with Jeff Ranson (Canada Green Building Council—GTA), and Jim Szautner (Southern Alberta Institute of Technology).

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Jeff Ranson

Jeff Ranson

Regional Director—Greater Toronto Area, Canada Green Building Council

Jim Szautner

Jim Szautner

Dean, School of Manufacturing and Automation, School of Transportation, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology

Episode 2

(27:27 min)

Driven by an equity, diversity, and inclusion lens, the Future Skills Centre recognizes the competitive advantage that comes from fostering innovative solutions which address the needs of underrepresented and disadvantaged groups, including women, youth, newcomers, racialized minorities, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ+ people, and people from Indigenous, rural, remote, and northern communities.

Through authentic engagement with grassroots organizations and diverse communities across Canada, as well as the use of a strength-based and asset-focused perspective, knowledge and solutions are needed that shift the focus from just “fixing” job seekers to eroding systemic barriers to change our institutions, helping us build a more inclusive and equitable labour market. In our second episode of Season 1 of the Future Skills Centre podcast, we speak to Maya Roy (YWCA),and Ed Ng (Bucknell University) to take on some of these issues.

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Maya Roy

Maya Roy

CEO, YWCA Canada

Ed Ng

Ed Ng

James and Elizabeth Freeman Chair in Management, Bucknell University

Episode 1

(30:32 min)

We’ve all heard it before: Technology is disrupting the world of work, eliminating “low skill” jobs and harming the future of the trades. Daunting? Sure. But there’s also growing demand for a specific type of worker. One with the ability to problem solve, lead, collaborate, communicate, and adapt to the ever-evolving world of work. In other words, there is a growing demand for strong social and emotional skills. The problem is, there is a gap between the demand for these skills and the skills Canadians acquire through education and training.

So, what exactly are these social and emotional skills? Why are they needed and why are we behind? What are our post-secondary systems doing to prepare future employees, and how do we ensure Canadians can “keep up” with changing demands throughout their careers? In our first episode of Season 1 of the Future Skills Centre podcast, we start to answer these questions through conversations with Paul Brinkhurst (Futureworx) and Jennifer Adams (OECD).

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Paul Brinkhurst

Paul Brinkhurst

Innovations Developer, Futureworx

Jennifer Adams

Jennifer Adams

Consultant and President, Karanga

Episode 0

(1:27 min)

A podcast exploring some of the most crucial emerging challenges to the future of work, presented by The Conference Board of Canada.

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Heather McIntosh

Heather McIntosh

Associate Director, The Conference Board of Canada

In partnership with:

Toronto Metropolitan University
The Conference Board of Canada
Blueprint
Funded by the Government of Canada’s Future Skills Program