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Saskatoon and Regina Economic Outlook 2019: After the Boom, Beyond the Bust

The Conference Board of Canada, November 6, 2018
Recorded Webinar by
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Saskatchewan’s boom years are over, however a slow and steady growth is still in place for the province’s two major population centres – Regina and Saskatoon. This live webinar from our Centre for Municipal Studies will give you a unique perspective on the national, provincial, Saskatoon and Regina economies. These insights are crucial for Saskatchewan’s business leaders and policy makers planning for 2019 and beyond.

Webinar Highlights

Who should watch?

This webinar is a must for business planners and strategists, economists, controllers, financial forecasters and business analysts, market and industry analysts, marketing and sales professionals, and policymakers.

By viewing this webinar, you will learn more about:

  • GDP Growth Continues Slowly – Both cities are expected to grow by slightly more than two percent annually in 2019 and 2020, with the pace of growth marginally higher in Saskatoon.
  • Population Increases Surpass Historical Pace – Population growth in both Saskatoon and Regina is expected to dip below the levels seen earlier in the decade, but average just under two per cent annually through 2022. Regina can expect annual net migratory inflows about three times greater more than the average of the previous 30 years. Saskatoon’s average net migration of 3,700 people annually is projected to compare favorably to historical trends.
  • Labour Market Remains Steady – Saskatoon is expected to record faster employment growth than Regina in 2019, but Regina will maintain a lower unemployment rate.
  • Housing Starts Rebound – Although there are backlogs in some segments of the housing markets, neither Regina nor Saskatoon appear to be generally overbuilt. Therefore, housing starts should edge upward over the medium term.
  • Industry on the Edge – As OneLeaf Cannabis Corporation is planning to build a production plant, Regina is being swept up in Canada’s burgeoning cannabis industry. The local economy also has an interest in the fate of the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion since pipeline-builder Evraz Steel is a major local employer. Saskatoon’s manufacturing sector is expected to post steady annual growth rates through 2022. The sector has posted strong productivity gains in recent years, and therefore has grown output without adding workers.

About Robin

Photo of Michael BurtRobin Wiebe has been an economist with the Centre for Municipal Studies since 2007. He has co-authored various housing reports for external clients and shared responsibility for the Centre’s regular municipal forecasts. He has also represented the Conference Board to various media on housing matters and made presentations to clients.

Prior to joining the Board, Robin was a market analyst with the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation for 18 years, serving in Thunder Bay, Windsor, Ontario and Ottawa. He prepared reports and delivered presentations on the housing market for various internal and external clients.

Robin holds a Bachelors’ degree in Economics from Wilfrid Laurier University and a Masters’ degree in Economics from the University of Guelph.

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