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Northern Development in Australia and Canada: National Narratives, Myths and Outcomes

The Conference Board of Canada, March 12, 2019
Recorded Webinar
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This recorded webinar explores economic development in Northern and remote Canada through the lens of an international comparison. In understanding how the narrative, myths and outcomes have played-out with respect to Northern development in Australia, participants will compare and contrast the manner in which development has unfolded in Northern Canada.

Presenters focus on the social-political history of Northern development discourse and formation in Australia, with some light comparison to Canada. In particular, they speak to the creation and continual reinvigoration of the ‘Grand Narrative’ for Northern development, one which is surprisingly consistent across time, both in its substance and generally poor outcomes. This grand narrative has also focused on Indigenous development aspirations (in all their diversity), and their implications for the State.

This webinar provides an opportunity for participants to learn from the shared and contrasting experiences that Australia and Canada have had with respect to Northern development, and to discuss options and opportunities for improved outcomes going forward.

Webinar Highlights

  • Learn about approaches to Northern development in Australia, and their associated outcomes and challenges.
  • Hear about Australia’s “Grand Narrative” and what it has meant for Indigenous groups and communities, development objectives and the state more generally.
  • Discuss with the speakers and webinar participants the various approaches to, and lessons learned from, Northern development in both Canada and Australia.
  • Discuss options and opportunities for improved outcomes going forward.

About Bill

Dr. Bill Fogarty, Research Fellow, Australian National University

Photo of Bill FogertyDr Bill Fogarty has lived and worked in remote communities for over 15 years and has extensive experience in research on Indigenous education, employment policy and service provision. He has qualifications in anthropology, communications, social research methods, education and applied development. He has worked on projects with a diverse range of organisations concerned with Indigenous Australia such as the Bawinanga Aboriginal Corporation, the Northern Land Council and the Northern Territory Government.

About Kathryn

Dr. Kathryn Andrews, Honorary Lecturer, Australian National University

Photo of Kate AndrewsWith over two decades of experience as a CEO, senior manager, chairperson, facilitator, consultant and researcher in diverse organisations in both regional and national roles, Dr. Kathryn Andrews has been involved in establishing and reforming NGOs; designing participatory processes; planning and implementing projects; sourcing millions of dollars; facilitating/chairing over 100 workshops and meetings; managing teams; and providing input to government policy. She has made significant contributions, particularly in natural resource management (NRM), governance, and research into practice and policy.

Based in Darwin from 2007, she has worked across northern Australia as an advisor/consultant, chaired the Northern Territory’s regional natural resource management body (an NGO), and participated in numerous national committees, including the Australian Landcare Council and CSIRO’s Sustainable Agriculture Flagship Advisory Committee. Her recently completed PhD explores the history of cropping and policy learning in northern Australia.

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