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Metropolitan Economic Trends-13 CMAs

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The 2016 Toronto Economic Outlook: Building a Strong Recovery

Toronto’s economy is on the upswing—real GDP growth surpassed 3 per cent in both 2014 and 2015, the first time that has happened since the late 1990s. In addition, the region is poised for more good news in 2016. So what’s happening in Canada’s largest city? Manufacturing output is expected to strengthen in the coming year, thanks to low oil prices, a weak Canadian dollar, and a healthy U.S. economy. At the same time, numerous non-residential projects will keep the construction sector busy, helping to offset a slowdown in housing starts. But can this growth continue? What else can Toronto residents expect in the coming year?

Recorded Webinar | April 2016 | Alan Arcand, Constantinos Bougas | The Conference Board of Canada

Vancouver: The 2016 Metropolitan Economic and Housing Outlook

Things are looking good for Vancouver in 2016. For the second year in a row, Vancouver is expected to be the fastest growing metro area in Canada among those covered in The Conference Board’s Metropolitan Outlook. Real GDP grew by 3.9 per cent last year – the largest gain since 2005 – and is forecast to rise by a further 3.3 per cent in 2016. What’s causing this growth? The construction sector is expected to lead the way thanks to steady new home construction and numerous non-residential and mixed-use projects. Meanwhile, manufacturing will continue to shine thanks to the federal government’s $8 billion shipbuilding contract, a weak Canadian dollar, and a healthy U.S. economy. But will this boom continue? And for how long? The housing market continues to soar, both in starts and in sales. Year-over-year price growth hit about 30 per cent in Vancouver and the Fraser Valley in February. Housing starts grew by an strong 5.3 per cent in 2015, and are expected to grow by another 2 per cent this year. Developers are focusing on building higher-density condominium and mixed-use properties across the region, but affordability remains a significant and growing concern.

Recorded Webinar | April 2016 | Alan Arcand | The Conference Board of Canada

Vancouver: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Vancouver metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Christopher Heschl | The Conference Board of Canada

Victoria: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Victoria metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Christopher Heschl | The Conference Board of Canada

Calgary: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Calgary metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Jane McIntyre | The Conference Board of Canada

Edmonton: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Edmonton metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Jane McIntyre | The Conference Board of Canada

Saskatoon: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Saskatoon metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Robin Wiebe | The Conference Board of Canada

Montréal: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Montréal metropolitan economy.This document contains both the French and the English versions of the articles.

Report | 20 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Henry Diaz | The Conference Board of Canada

Québec City: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Québec City metropolitan economy.This document contains both the French and the English versions of the articles.

Report | 20 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Henry Diaz | The Conference Board of Canada

Toronto: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Toronto metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Henry Diaz | The Conference Board of Canada

Halifax: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Halifax metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Janalee Sweetland | The Conference Board of Canada

Hamilton: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Hamilton metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Jane McIntyre | The Conference Board of Canada

Winnipeg: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Winnipeg metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Robin Wiebe | The Conference Board of Canada

Ottawa–Gatineau: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Ottawa-Gatineau metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Henry Diaz | The Conference Board of Canada

Regina: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the Regina metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Robin Wiebe | The Conference Board of Canada

The Atlantic Canada Outlook: Waves of Growth in 2016

Despite uncertain economic prospects, and lower growth rates for the provinces themselves, cities in Atlantic Canada are outperforming many of their peers across the country. In fact, two Maritime cities rank in the top 10 among 28 Canadian cities covered in The Conference Board of Canada's Metropolitan Outlook. So what’s the cause of this growth? And will it continue into next year and beyond? Join Alan Arcand from the Conference Board’s Centre for Municipal Studies as he provides an in-depth look at the economic outlooks for four cities in Atlantic Canada: Halifax, Moncton, Saint John, and St. John's. Halifax and Moncton rank in the top tier of cities for economic growth in 2016, while Saint John is expected to see growth top 2 per cent for the second year in a row. The situation in St. John's mirrors that of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, but Mature oil wells and a slowing construction sector are expected to hamper growth in 2016.

Recorded Webinar | March 2016 | Alan Arcand | The Conference Board of Canada

The 2016 Metropolitan Outlook: Canadian Urbanomics

Our cities are the driving forces of Canada’s regional and provincial economies. Understanding how and why these cities are performing economically is critical for businesses and government leaders when making decisions about the year ahead. Don’t miss this opportunity to be as informed as you can be with Canada’s most comprehensive economic forecast for Canadian Cities. Don’t miss our Metropolitan Outlook for 2016. In this exclusive webinar, you’ll hear the Conference Board’s annual coast-to-coast forecast for 28 Canadian cities. This presentation will give you everything you need to know about how cities from St. John’s to Victoria will fare in 2016, which ones are outpacing the others, and why. The cities we’ll be covering include: Atlantic Canada: St. John’s, Moncton, Saint John, Halifax Quebec: Montreal, Quebec City, Sherbrooke, Saguenay, Trois-Rivières, Ontario: Toronto, Ottawa-Gatineau, Hamilton, Kingston, Oshawa, Kitchener-Waterloo-Cambridge, London, St. Catharines-Niagara, Windsor, Thunder Bay, Sudbury Western Canada: Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, Victoria, Abbotsford-Mission

Recorded Webinar | March 2016 | Alan Arcand | The Conference Board of Canada

Metropolitan Outlook 1: Economic Insights into 13 Canadian Metropolitan Economies, Winter 2016

This publication focuses on the metropolitan economies of Halifax, Quebec City, Montreal, Ottawa-Gatineau, Toronto, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, and Victoria.

Report | 80 pages | March 2016 | Alan Arcand, Jane McIntyre, Robin Wiebe, Henry Diaz, Christopher Heschl | The Conference Board of Canada

Un tableau de bord pour la région métropolitaine de Montréal

Montréal est la force motrice du Québec pour ce qui est de l'apport au PIB global et aux recettes fiscales. Pourtant, pour ce qui est de l'activité économique, elle continue à tirer de l'arrière par rapport à la plupart des villes de taille semblable en Amérique du Nord. Beaucoup estiment que l'économie de Montréal est en perte de vitesse (perte de sièges sociaux, croissance relativement faible) et que la ville n'attire pas nécessairement les meilleurs talents. Cette perception est-elle exacte? L'Institut du Québec (IdQ), en collaboration avec la Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain et Montréal International, a comparé Montréal à 14 villes nord-américaines et à quelques villes européennes. La région métropolitaine de Montréal continue d'être relativement intéressante pour les entreprises. Celles-ci y profitent d'un nombre important d'avantages fiscaux, et les frais d'exploitation y sont moins élevés qu'ailleurs en Amérique du Nord. Cependant, une pénurie de main-d'œuvre qualifiée et des faiblesses en matière d'innovation représentent d'importantes lacunes que Montréal doit combler pour concurrencer les autres régions métropolitaines de taille comparable en Amérique du Nord et les villes comparables en Europe. Joignez-vous à nous pour ce webinaire de 60 minutes au cours duquel Jean-Guy Côté présentera les conclusions du premier tableau de bord pour la région métropolitaine de Montréal. L'IdQ prévoit compiler ces indicateurs chaque année afin de suivre de près la performance de Montréal.

Recorded Webinar | December 2015 | Jean-Guy Côté | Le Conference Board du Canada

Ottawa–Gatineau: Metropolitan Outlook 1, Autumn 2015

This publication focuses on the Ottawa-Gatineau metropolitan economy.

Report | 14 pages | September 2015 | Alan Arcand, Constantinos Bougas, Elise Martin, Jane McIntyre, Robin Wiebe | The Conference Board of Canada

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