Doing More with Less: Energy Efficiency Potential in Canada

The Conference Board of Canada, 66 pages, August 24, 2017
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This report provides an overview of available national and provincial energy efficiency potential studies to assist in assessing the remaining energy efficiency potential in Canada.

Document Highlights

This report provides an overview of available national and provincial energy efficiency potential studies to assist in assessing the remaining energy efficiency potential in Canada. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), approximately two-thirds of economically feasible, global energy efficiency measures have not been implemented. Therefore, several recent studies have attempted to quantify the remaining energy potential that exists in Canada—and, to improve energy efficiency, identify the barriers that exist. This report provides an overview of these studies. It also applies the studies’ average energy-intensity improvements to the National Energy Board’s long-term energy forecast to determine the impact that such developments would have on future energy consumption in Canada. The report concludes that energy efficiency enrichment, if more aggressively pursued, could reduce stationary energy consumption by up to 15 per cent by 2035. The enhancements could also represent an important policy component of Canada’s approach to reducing GHG emissions.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Chapter 1—Introduction

Chapter 2—Energy Use and Energy Efficiency in Canada

  • Benefits of Increased Energy Efficiency
  • Barriers to Increased Energy Efficiency
  • Market Failures
  • Behavioural Failures
  • The Role of Policy in Addressing Market and Behavioural Failures
  • Canadian Energy Efficiency Policy
  • National Efforts Score
  • Building Sector Score
  • Industrial Sector Score
  • Transportation Sector Score
  • Summary

Chapter 3—Literature Survey of Canadian Energy Efficiency Potential Studies

  • Canada
  • British Columbia
  • Alberta
  • Ontario
  • Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Yukon

Chapter 4—Planned Utility Spending on Energy Efficiency

Chapter 5—Conclusions

Appendix A—Bibliography

Appendix B—List of Utility Companies

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