Improving Primary Health Care through Collaboration

The Conference Board of Canada, April 22, 2014
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The Conference Board has released a report that reveals that making interprofessional primary care (IPC) teams the standard model for delivery of primary health care services across Canada could help improve patient outcomes while reining in costs. This 60 minute recorded webinar brings the research findings to life and showcases the fact that IPC team care could save the health care system almost $3 billion in direct and indirect costs of diabetes and depression complications alone.

Webinar Highlights

Report author Thy Dinh, Senior Research Associate in the Board's Canadian Alliance for Sustainable Health Care division and Louis Thériault, Executive Director, Economic Initiatives, discuss the report findings and its key recommendations, including:

  • federal, provincial and territorial governments adopt a funding and payment system that supports IPC
  • health care providers and administrators provide appropriate mix of service providers to meet service requirements in the most cost-effective way and within the available funding and supply of health care professionals
  • patients be open to receiving care from and consulting with different health providers
  • About Thy:

    Photo of Thy DinhThy is a Senior Research Associate, Health Economics, for the Canadian Alliance for Sustainable Health Care.

     


    About Louis:

    Photo of Louis TheriaultLouis is the Executive Director, Economic Initiatives. He joined the The Conference Board of Canada in 1997, where he specializes in product development, and in macroeconomic and microeconomic analysis.


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