What's to Eat? Improving Food Literacy in Canada

The Conference Board of Canada, 62 pages, October 2013
Report by Jessica Brichta, Alison Howard
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This report discusses why food literacy matters; analyzes the state of food literacy in Canada; highlights current efforts to develop food literacy; and recommends strategies to further improve Canadian household food literacy.

Cette publication comprend un résumé en français.

Document Highlights

In recent years, there has been a rise in interest in the role of food in health and in how food is grown and processed. Yet, it is unclear whether household attitudes, skills, and knowledge about food—food literacy—have developed along with that interest. This report reveals that there are gaps and deficits in Canadians’ knowledge and skills related to food.

Improving food literacy in Canada will support healthier choices in diet and nutrition and better food skills, leading to improved nutrition and health outcomes. Information and education are crucial, but must be presented using strategies that engender lasting behavioural changes. This report discusses why food literacy matters (in terms of dietary, health, and environmental outcomes); analyzes the current state of food literacy in Canada; highlights current efforts to develop food literacy; and recommends strategies to further improve Canadian household food literacy.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Résumé

Chapter 1—Introduction

  • Purpose of the Report
  • Food Literacy Defined
  • Framework
  • Methodology

Chapter 2—Why Food Literacy Matters

  • Food Literacy's Relative Importance
  • Food Literacy and Dietary Outcomes
  • Food Literacy and Health Outcomes
  • Food Literacy and Environmental Outcomes
  • Conclusion

Chapter 3—The State of Food Literacy in Canada

  • Nutritional and Dietary Knowledge
  • Meal Planning and Preparation
  • Point-of-Purchase Nutrition Information and Claims
  • Food Safety
  • Planning and Budgeting for Food
  • Food Production, Processing, Distribution, and Waste
  • Marketing and Advertising
  • Conclusion

Chapter 4—Strategies to Improve Food Literacy

  • Food Literacy Improvement Initiatives
  • Public-Private Partnerships
  • Conclusion

Chapter 5—Future Considerations

  • Recommendations for Improving Food Literacy
  • Conclusion

Appendix A—Bibliography

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