Addressing Gaps in the Transportation Network: Seizing Canada’s Continental Gateway Advantage

The Conference Board of Canada, 12 pages, October 22, 2007
Briefing by
3.2/5 based on 4 reviews
(You must be signed in and entitled to rate this report)
Of the NAFTA countries, Canada is the closest geographically to both Europe and Asia—well positioned as a continental gateway. But there is a gap in Canada’s physical infrastructure capacity, which is made wider by “soft” issues. This report discusses actions that could render Canadian ports as North America’s gateways of choice.

Document Highlights

Of the three NAFTA countries, Canada is the closest geographically to both Europe and Asia, has the lowest export administrative burden, and has recently made or announced important port and border investments. The country is, therefore, well positioned as a continental gateway. However, there is a gap in Canada’s physical infrastructure capacity to meet continental gateway needs, and the gap is made wider by “soft” issues. It is these “soft” issues—for example, establishing common hours of service standards for truck drivers, or developing an education strategy to build industry skills— that may be even more critical to Canada’s long-term international competitiveness than physical infrastructure spending. Addressing Gaps in the Transportation Network: Seizing Canada’s Continental Gateway Advantage discusses several actions that governments (federal and provincial) and businesses could take to render Canadian ports as North America’s gateways of choice.

This report was produced by the Conference Board’s International Trade and Investment Centre that examines the implications of global economic dynamics for Canadian business and governments leaders. More on the Centre’s research, events, and membership

Access document

(you will be asked to sign-in)

Price: $0
You can get this research for free. Take a minute and create an e-Library account.