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Accessible Employment Practices

Upcoming Workshops

Making Accessibility Real in Your Organization

Tuesday, June 5, 2018
Kitchener/Waterloo, ON

The Conference Board of Canada, in partnership with leading employers and service providers of the Kitchener/Waterloo area, invite you to attend a half-day workshop for employers on making workplaces more accessible for people with disabilities.

This workshop is designed to provide organizations with a deeper understanding of strategies and practices for making workplaces truly accessible, approaches to nurture a culture of inclusion, and techniques for productive conversations around accommodation. It will leave you with actionable ideas on how to bring an inclusive and accessible philosophy to life in your organization, while leveraging the business benefits of accessibility.

Fees

  • Regular Rate: $75
  • Small Business: $50 (Please contact us for more details on registering as a small business)

Questions? Contact: HREducation@conferenceboard.ca

Location
Waterloo A/B Room
Holiday Inn Kitchener-Cambridge Conference Centre
30 Fairway Road South, at Highway 8
Kitchener ON

This workshop is sponsored by the Accessibility Directorate of Ontario under the EnablingChange Program.


Accessibility Innovates

Thursday, June 14, 2018
Toronto, ON

The Conference Board of Canada, in partnership with thought-leaders and innovators from the Greater Toronto area, invite you to attend a one-day workshop for employers on making workplaces more accessible for people with disabilities and leveraging technology to make Ontario barrier free.

Having a strategy to address accommodation through all stages of employment is essential. This workshop is designed to provide organizations with a deeper understanding of strategies and practices for making workplaces truly accessible, and approaches to nurture a culture of inclusion. The program will include actionable ideas on how to adapt the workplace for employees with mental health needs and disabilities so that they can be productive and contribute to the success of your organization. Participants will have the opportunity to explore emerging technologies that connect highly skilled and motivated job seekers to employers and new tools to open your business to the growing consumer market of people with disabilities.

Fees

  • Regular Rate: $100
  • Please contact us for more details on registering as a small business.

Questions? Contact: HREducation@conferenceboard.ca

Location
Ryerson University
The Peter Bronfman Learning Centre
7th Floor, 297 Victoria Street
Toronto, ON

This workshop is sponsored by the Accessibility Directorate of Ontario under the EnablingChange Program.


Now Released

The Business Case to Build Physically Accessible Environments

Making work spaces and facilities more accessible would allow people with physical disabilities to participate more fully in the workforce, lifting overall economic activity by $16.8 billion by 2030, according to a new report by The Conference Board of Canada.

The report, The Business Case to Build Physically Accessible Environments, provides results of a survey of Canadians with physical disabilities to identify barriers for workforce participation and calculates the economic impacts associated with increased labour participation.

This research was undertaken by The Conference Board of Canada on behalf of the Rick Hansen Foundation.


Welcome to The Conference Board of Canada’s website on accessibility. Accessible workplaces and employment practices that support people with disabilities are an emerging priority as our population ages and employers seek new sources of skilled, highly motivated employees.

About 11% of working-age Canadians have disabilities. Most disabilities are mild to moderate and levels of educational attainment are quickly catching up to the general population.1 Yet persons with disabilities are far more likely than the general population to be unemployed or underemployed. Barriers to employment range from negative attitudes and incorrect assumptions about the abilities of individuals, to job application procedures that are often difficult for those persons with disabilities.

Accessibility Practices

Ontario has introduced standards concerning employment of people with disabilities. Ontario’s unique approach focuses on good practices as opposed to numerical targets, and other jurisdictions may soon follow with similar regulations. The bottom line, however, is that accessible employment practices are simply fundamentally sound practices that benefit businesses and the economy. Some benefits include better job retention, higher attendance, lower turnover, enhanced job performance and work quality, better safety records, and a more innovative workforce. The full inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of community life and the workplace opens the door to their full participation in the economy as customers, entrepreneurs, and employees.

This website contains educational material and resources to help you and your organization create an accessible and inclusive workplace for people with disabilities.


Hot Topics on Accessible Employment Practices 

For up-to-date information on news and developments in accessible organizations please visit the Accessible Employment Practices LinkedIn Group.

The Process to Develop an Individual Accommodation Plan

Jan 20, 2016
Laura McKeen Laura McKeen
Lawyer
Cohen Highley LLP

As of January 2016, businesses and private sector organizations across Ontario with more than 50 employees are required to develop a written process for developing documented individual accommodation plans (IAPs) for employees with disabilities. This requirement is found in Section 28 of the Integrated Accessibility Standard Regulation (IASR) of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).

The Conference Board of Canada’s Employers’ Toolkit: Making Ontario Workplaces Accessible to People With Disabilities is a free resource that provides practical tips and useful tools for employers when developing their policies and procedures. If you have not seen the toolkit, you can access it here.

Creating an IAP Process

While there is a requirement to create and document a process for developing IAPs, obligated organizations have some flexibility when creating accessibility policies. You can build the IAP process into your existing human resources policies and procedures, or create separate IAP policies and procedures.

When looking to formalize this process, you should make every effort to make the process work for your own industry and business. You should also remember that the AODA does not replace the Employment Standards Act, Ontario’s Human Rights Code, or any other applicable legislation.

The Process to Develop an IAP

Subsection 28(2) of the AODA requires employers to include the following eight elements into the IAP process:

  1. How the employee requesting accommodation can participate in the development of the individual accommodation plan.
  2. How the employee is assessed on an individual basis.
  3. How the employer can request an evaluation by an outside medical or other expert, at the employer’s expense, to assist in determining if the accommodation can be achieved, and if so, how it can be achieved.
  4. How the employee can request a representative from their bargaining agent (if applicable) or other representative from the workplace to participate in developing the accommodation plan.
  5. The steps taken to protect the privacy of the employee’s personal information.
  6. The frequency the IAP will be reviewed and updated, and how it will be done. (Please note the times when it is mandatory to review emergency workplace response information.)
  7. If an individual accommodation plan is denied, how the reasons for the denial will be provided to the employee.
  8. The means of providing the IAP in a format that takes into account the employee’s accessibility needs.

The IAP Itself

Once you have developed the process you will use, you will also need to think about the format of the IAP that will work best for your organization. There is no prescribed format for the IAP. You can develop one that makes sense for your business.

If required, the IAP must include:

  • any information about accessible formats and communications supports provided, as described in Section 26 of the IASR;
  • individualized information on the workplace’s emergency response procedures, as described in Section 27 of the IASR.

The IAP shall also identify any other accommodation that is to be provided.

The Business Case for an Inclusive and Collaborative IAP Process

There are many articles and studies outlining the business case for accessible employment practices. One of those documents is the Conference Board of Canada’s Business Benefits of Accessible Workplaces.

You may be required to develop an IAP process, but this could also be an opportunity to review your accommodation process and determine if you truly have an inclusive and collaborative accommodation process.

Taking the time to develop an inclusive, collaborative, and effective IAP process—one that makes sense for your organization—can position your organization to improve your bottom line. Accessible and inclusive employment practices have been found to achieve better job retention, higher attendance, lower turnover, enhanced job performance and work quality, better safety records, and a more innovative workforce.

Laura McKeen is a partner with Cohen Highley LLP in London.

Click here to learn more about the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.


The views and/or opinions expressed in this article belong to the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect The Conference Board of Canada’s position. Responsibility for content accuracy also rests with the author(s).


1    Statistics Canada, Canadian Survey on Disabilities, 2012 (Ottawa: Statistics Canada, December 3, 2013).

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For more information on accessibility research by The Conference Board of Canada, please contact us by e-mail.

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Compliance Questions

For any questions regarding compliance or legislation, please contact the Accessibility Directorate of Ontario.

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