Exploring Canada’s Top Privacy Challenges: Summary Report of the Canadian Privacy Summit 2016

The Conference Board of Canada, 75 pages, August 30, 2016
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This report provides information and insights on stakeholder positions concerning the legislative environment for privacy and data, and other emerging privacy issues, as expressed at the Canadian Privacy Summit 2016.

Document Highlights

Data privacy touches the economy, society, and individuals. There is increasing anxiety around privacy, and Canada needs to strike a balance between ensuring personal privacy and enabling organizations to sell and access personalized products and services.

To further our collective national understanding of key and emerging privacy issues in Canada, The Conference Board of Canada and the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of British Columbia co-hosted the Canadian Privacy Summit on April 13–14, 2016, in Vancouver, British Columbia. This report provides information and insights from many of Canada’s foremost privacy experts in the public and private sectors, as expressed at the summit, concerning the legislative environment for privacy and data, and other emerging privacy issues.

Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Chapter 1—Introduction

  • Purpose, Audience, and Topics
  • Summit Opening and Stage Setting
  • Report Organization

Chapter 2—Transparency and Consent

  • Canada’s Privacy Legislation in the Paper Age
  • Canada’s Privacy Legislation in the Digital Age
  • (Re)Constituting Meaningful Consent
  • Public Forums, Social Media, and Data Collection Consent
  • Situating Consent
  • Consent in Data Collection and Use
  • Attitudes Toward Privacy
  • Privacy Protections for Youth
  • Employee Analytics and Monitoring
  • Conclusion

Chapter 3—Trends in Accountability

  • Legal/Regulatory Compliance
  • Internal Accountability
  • Conclusion

Chapter 4—Online Tracking and Behavioural Advertising

  • Advertising and Privacy
  • Customer Tracking
  • Opting Out
  • Industry Self-Regulation
  • Selling Your Own Data
  • Use of Data by Third Parties
  • Conclusion

Chapter 5—Privacy and Surveillance

  • Law Enforcement Data Responsibilities
  • Protection and Security
  • Organizational Reactions to Data Requests
  • Conclusion

Chapter 6—Perspectives on Privacy Regulation in Canada

  • Global Comparisons
  • Too Much Regulation or Too Little?
  • Privacy and the Data Industry

Chapter 7—Opportunities for the Future of Privacy in Canada

  • Consent-Based Privacy Protection
  • Protecting Anonymity
  • Transparency
  • Opportunities
  • Conclusion

Appendix A—Bibliography

Appendix B—Complete Summit Program and Session Descriptions

Appendix C—Sponsors and Supporters

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